The Sunshine Factor

where sunshine is a way of life

To Target Corporation Managers: Are good manners really a thing of the past?

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English: Logo of Target, US-based retail chain

English: Logo of Target, US-based retail chain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dear Target store managers (and really, other store managers too):

I have not been treated well at the Target store in my neighborhood lately. Your clerks don’t seem to be aware that they have a job, and that is to help other people. I have been planning to say something about this for quite awhile, and now for the last two Saturdays have spoken to the checkout person who rang me out.

I said to the young lady a week ago and the young man today:

“Excuse me, but I didn’t hear you say thank you.” (I said this in my normal, soft-spoken and pleasant manner.)

The girl said, “Sorry,” and proceeded to thank me.

The boy said, “But I TOLD you to have a good day!” I don’t care that he gave me a dirty look or that he thought I was Godzilla — I want to get my point across. And maybe someday, if people take my example, the clerks will learn that we, their customers, should hear a little “thank you” when they buy something from your store. If we don’t shop there anymore, then jobs will be limited – you won’t need many clerks at all.

Some clerks don’t even say hello to the customers anymore. While they are busy thinking of the romantic evening they will have, they plunk your change or receipt into your hand, don’t say a word, and start working on the next customer. Or, they say “have a good day.”

It doesn’t take rocket science to notice that “have a good day” is not the same as “thank you.” When a clerk says thank you, he is in effect saying, “Thank you for shopping here. You could have gone somewhere else, but you shopped here, and I want to thank you.”

I would rather hear a simple two words, “thank you”, than be told to have a nice day. I was already having a good day and don’t need your help, thank you very much, unless it is the manager having a small talk with their employees.

Who are the parents who did not train their kids to say “please and thanks”?? Doesn’t anyone appreciate things anymore? Are we supposed to automatically hand children whatever they want? (I don’t think so.) Maybe the parents think it’s up to the schools to train the children with manners. (Manners are simple every-day courtesies.) And maybe teachers think it’s not their job. Whatever the case is, we need to have teenagers learn good manners BEFORE they take on a job in the public eye.

Lest you think I am just a person who is ornery and feels like complaining, I will tell you, and everyone who knows me can attest, I am a very loving person, and every time I notice an employee working really hard, I go find their manager and give them a compliment about their employee. I report on all things good, and it is not my nature to complain. That’s why for me to write this complaint letter, it’s a very rare letter indeed.

It’s just a small matter of manners and courtesy that has turned into a big problem. Please start the change toward manners in your store, and your clientele will remain with you. Thank you!

Author: Debb Stanton

I am an optimistic, positive person who is a seven year cancer survivor. Since that time I have learned that getting a cancer diagnosis does not always mean an automatic death sentence. I like to share my hope with others and continue to encourage them - no matter who they are or what they need encouragement for. I write poems, prayers, articles, and stories. Recently the premiere issue of my online magazine, http://www.innersunshine.net launched. Thank you for visiting!

~Let me know you were here~

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